Black Lives Matter Resources - Providence Campus

11/4/2020: Black Lives Matter Vigil Updated

 

This resource page has been created based on feedback from students who have participated in recent conversations. Thank you for your ideas, energy and commitment to this vital work. We value our diverse campus community and look forward to deepening JWU’s commitment to a campus culture in which every student is welcomed, respected and heard. In the coming academic year, the university will be assembling a committee to evaluate recruitment and hiring practices to improve the diversity of our faculty and staff. In addition, the John Hazen White College of Arts & Sciences will review the current course offerings on race, gender and bias and evaluate the relevancy of these courses in today’s climate. In-person discussions will also take place on topics such as refocusing the university’s BRIDGE to better serve students of color; student training on how to spot bias and micro-aggression; and ally support.

 

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Academic Courses

Black Lives Matter Vigil

Campus Democracy Challenge

Counseling Services

Diversity Dialogues Leadership Series

Equity & Compliance Services (ECS)

Inclusivity at JWU Module: Confronting Bias Initiative

Library Services

Local Community Organizations Working for Racial Justice

Media & Politics Café

Planning to Attend a Protest

Silent Witness Program

Student Clubs & Orgs

 

Academic Courses

JWU teaches about race in the following undergraduate courses in the College of Arts & Sciences. Race also is part of other courses – in Anthropology, Gender, History, Political Science, Religion, Sociology – that aren't included here, to keep the list short. Please review the JWU Catalog for full course offerings and descriptions.

 

  • ANTH 1050 Cultural Anthropology

  • ANTH 3060 Indigenous Perspectives in Global Context

  • CJS 2150 Criminal Justice Ethics

  • CJS 3033 Community Policing

  • COMM 3400 Communicating Across Cultures

  • GEND 1040 Introduction to Gender Studies

  • HIST 2300 History of Globalization

  • HIST 3020 A Multicultural History of America

  • ILS 2003 The American Dream

  • ILS 2010 Modern Identities: 20th Century Literature and Beyond

  • ILS 2015 Honors Seminar: Postcolonial Literature

  • ILS 2150 Introduction to American Studies

  • ILS 4070 Nostalgia, Memory and Hybrid Identity

  • ILS 4110 Capital Punishment in America

  • ILS 4133 How to Change the World

  • ILS 4302 Abuse of Power: Corruption in Contemporary Society

  • ILS 4320 (De)Constructing Race and Color

  • LIT 2030 African-American Literature

  • LIT 2090 Multi-Ethnic Literature

  • MCST 3050 Media Identities

  • MCST 3300 Hip-Hop Culture

  • PHIL 3240 Ethics: A Global Perspective

  • PSCI 2200 Race Politics and Power in America

  • PSCI 3200 Women in American Political Life

  • PSCI 3500 Political Parties Social Movements and Interest Groups

  • PSCI 4100 Issues in Political Theory: The Politics of Human Rights in Global Perspective

  • REL 2001 Comparative Study of World Religions

  • SOC 2005 Honors Seminar: Social Inequalities

  • SOC 2050 Cultures of Africa

  • SOC 2055 Honors Seminar: Peoples and Cultures of Africa

  • SOC 2070 Social Issues in Contemporary America

  • SOC 3025 Cultural Tapestry: Perspectives in Diversity

  • SOC 3100 Sociology of Race and Ethnicity

  • SOC 3720 Intersecting Inequalities 

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Black Lives Matter Vigil

In memory of many, in honor of all. The JWU Student Government Association (SGA) has scheduled a vigil for Saturday, 11/7/2020, vigil to mourn those we have lost, celebrate their memories, and discuss how we move forward. Register via Zoom.

 

SGA will continue to hold open meetings and serve as a resource for our students and organizations. Please follow and connect with SGA to express your voice and concerns: Facebook, Twitter and Instagram; or email sga@jwu.edu.

 

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Campus Democracy Challenge - JWU is ALL IN 

JWU Providence is committed to increasing Wildcat participation in this year's presidential election. To ensure that our students become active, informed, engaged voters, President Marie Bernardo-Sousa, LP.D. '92 has signed the campus on to the ALL IN Campus Democracy Challenge indicating that JWU makes nonpartisan voter participation a priority. You can help JWU meet its goal – let students know their vote matters. Here's a graphic designed by a JWU student to encourage other JWU students to register. The Challenge is a collaboration between the John Hazen White College of Arts & Sciences, Office of Student Engagement, the BRIDGE, Student Government Association, and Political Science Club.

 

If you have questions about your own voter registration, visit your state's voter registration website: Rhode Island, Massachusetts, Connecticut

 

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Counseling Services

Mental health is important. This confidential resource supports JWU students in managing their emotional wellbeing. We offer short-term individual therapy, group therapy, crisis intervention, consultation, and referrals. Stephanie Dixon, director of JWU Providence Counseling Services:

 

We believe it is critically important for our students to be seen and to be heard during this time. Counseling Services will continue to be a safe and affirming place for students to be seen, to be heard, and to be supported. We are committed to supporting our students and working to effect change in our campus community and beyond. Students are dealing with so much uncertainty right now along with a tremendous amount of emotion and feelings like anger, pain, fear, grief, sadness, to name a only a few. If students feel isolated and are having difficulties coping we would strongly encourage them to reach out for support.

To make an appointment, call our office at 401-598-1016. Our standard hours are Monday-Friday, 8:30am-4:30pm (8:30am-1pm on summer Fridays). Note: For after-hours emergencies, contact an on-call counselor at 888-222-4805.

 

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Diversity Dialogues Leadership Series

The office of Student Engagement is pleased to announce a new addition to our leadership lineup… Diversity Dialogues. On Wednesday evenings from October 21 – December 9, participants will learn more about the weekly subject matter from shared experiences and rich discussion. Join this community-wide initiative, engaging in dialogue with students, faculty, staff and alumni. Topics include oppression and privilege, gender and sexual identity and much more. Click here to register and be sure to encourage others to attend.

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Equity & Compliance Services (ECS)

Dedicated to fostering ethical practices and working with the JWU community, ECS strives to promote a culture of equity and compliance, and advance JWU’s commitment to creating an environment that values integrity, shared respect and responsibility. Visit www.jwu.edu/compliance to contact our team or to learn more about our areas of focus, services, policies & resources, reporting options (including anonymous reporting options) and nondiscrimination campus liaisons.

 

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Inclusivity at JWU Module: Confronting Bias Initiative

We ask that all incoming and returning students complete this information module prior to the start of fall classes. The BRIDGE and Student Engagement offices are pleased to introduce this module, which:

 

  • Helps participants recognize that we all hold bias
  • Shares strategies to address our own bias as well as bias we encounter from others
  • Outlines the various JWU resources that can help with this important work 

All members of the JWU community are expected to recognize the importance of accepting others, which includes valuing the diverse identities and experiences that each member of the JWU community brings to campus. Engaging with these materials will help you contribute to a more inclusive community as we demonstrate these values on campus, across the country, and around the world. Training regarding anti-racist practices is being conducted with all faculty and staff prior to the start of the semester as well.

 

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Library Services

Reference & Instruction Services Librarian Sarah Campbell and Reference Librarian Jennifer Castel created a comprehensive LibGuide with links to Black Lives Matter and anti-racism resources, including print books, films, and articles that can all be accessed for free by the JWU community. Campbell emphasizes that this Guide is a work in progress, and the plan is to keep it updated as more materials become available. Here is the Library’s statement about the Guide:

 

JWU Library stands with Black Lives Matter in denouncing systemic racism and working to address oppression. We are committed to centering voices and stories that have been historically silenced. Representation matters. Stories matter. Intersectionality matters. Reading and listening to marginalized voices is crucial in building an actively anti-racist society. Take a step to dismantle oppression by centering the voices of Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC) as they call out for change. This reading list is a living document and will be updated regularly; to suggest a book or join our Virtual Book Club to discuss ‘The New Jim Crow’ by Michelle Alexander, contact Sarah Campbell Scampbell@jwu.edu or Jenny Castel jcastel@jwu.edu.

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Media & Politics Café: The Politics of Pandemics Tuesday, October 6

The John Hazen White College of Arts & Sciences, in partnership with the College of Health & Wellness and JWU Alumni Relations, will host this fall’s Media & Politics Café on Tuesday, October 6, from 6:30-7:45pm. A virtual panel discussion, it will explore "The Politics of Pandemics: Communities of Color and Disproportionate Impacts, from HIV/AIDS to the Coronavirus Crisis," and will be moderated by Cara Sammartino, associate professor, department chair, Health Sciences, College of Health & Wellness.

Panelists are: NBC 10’s Barbara Morse, who has covered health at Rhode Island’s leading local news station; Pablo Rodriguez, MD, chair of the Women & Infants Health Care Alliance, president and CEO at Women's Care, former medical director of Planned Parenthood of Rhode Island, and a clinical associate professor at The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University; Womazetta Jones, secretary, Rhode Island’s Executive Office of Health and Human Services (EOHHS), with almost 30 years of human services experience; and, Carlton E. Green, Ph.D., clinical psychologist and director of Diversity Training at the University of Maryland.

Faculty and staff are invited to attend (and to share the invite with their students). Registration is required and can be completed here.

 

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Planning to Attend a Protest?

Amnesty International, the world’s largest grassroots human rights organization, created a guide for protesting safely. The guide includes information on your rights as a protestor, what to do, what not to do, what to bring, what to wear and how to deal with teargas.

 

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Silent Witness Program

This program allows students to report concerns anonymously to Campus Safety & Security (CS&S), especially when students are nervous about coming forward. Note: this program does not replace the need to contact CS&S directly with information about an emergency or potential harmful situation. During those situations, contact CS&S immediately at 401-598-1103.

 

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Student Clubs & Orgs

The Office of Student Engagement has been impressed with your involvement, your voice, and your courage while fighting for social justice in our communities and in our country. We have followed your social media posts, read your messages, and communicated with some of you directly as we continue to find ways to move forward, be better and grow stronger together. Our office is committed to doing better by seeking ways to improve ourselves and our processes as well as educate others.


We will offer a series of programs and social media campaigns on social justice starting this summer and continuing in the academic year. As we continue to repost the great work and advocacy of our clubs and organizations, we are also creating our own collection of resources and programs that we will continue to share. Know that we are committed to learning, educating and improving to best serve your needs and to support your experiences at JWU. We ask that you continue to communicate with us, tell us how we can support your group and show us what talented and dedicated student leaders you are. We miss you, we are proud of all that you have done and will continue to do, and cannot wait to see you on campus. Please:


Get involved. Student Engagement offers over 110 student clubs and organizations. There is something for everyone, from special interest clubs, cultural and religious groups, academic groups to enhance your studies and service and advocacy groups, along with our Fraternities and Sororities (joining Greek Life has its own process; please make an appointment to speak with someone in Student Engagement to get more information).


Joining a club or organization is easy! Visit the Involvement Network (via jwuLink) and contact the groups you are interested in joining. Contact our office for more info, or to get info on starting a new club, if something else would better suit your interests.

 

Specific groups of interest:

  • Black Student Alliance
  • Cultural Connections Club
  • Fraternities/Sororities: Alpha Phi Alpha; Groove Phi Groove; Omega Phi Beta; Phi Beta Sigma; Sigma Gamma Rho; Swing Phi Swing; Zeta Phi Beta
  • JWU Live (check out the Black JWU Radio Show)
  • National Society of Minorities in Hospitality
  • Shabach Step Team
  • Shed Some Light

 

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Local Community Organizations Working for Racial Justice

Please email bridgecenter@jwu.edu to tell us about any organizations and initiatives you would like to add.


Black Lives Matter - #BlackLivesMatter was founded in 2013 in response to the acquittal of Trayvon Martin’s murderer. Black Lives Matter Foundation, Inc is a global organization in the US, UK, and Canada, whose mission is to eradicate white supremacy and build local power to intervene in violence inflicted on Black communities by the state and vigilantes. By combating and countering acts of violence, creating space for Black imagination and innovation, and centering Black joy, we are winning immediate improvements in our lives. See list of chapters here .


Amos House - The mission of Amos House is to help people help themselves out of homelessness and poverty through vital services and results-oriented programs. Amos House’s Guiding Principals are:


  • All people are to be treated with dignity and respect

  • People have the inherent ability to succeed

  • The causes of poverty are complex and require innovative responses

  • Community is the foundation of our work

  • We all grow when we work together

Direct Action For Rights and Equality - DARE’s mission is to organize low-income families in communities of color for social, political and economic justice. The methodology involves base building with community members, conducting direct action organizing campaigns for institutional change, doing deliberate leadership development and political education and contributing to efforts for a larger movement of justice.


EduLeaders of Color - EduLeaders of Color is a people-centered initiative in Rhode Island focused on education to unite and empower people of color. It provides platforms for educators of color to speak on matters of social justice and increase social capital with allies who listen, community organizations and resources for their work.


Higher Ground International - Higher Ground International works to restore dignity, empower lives, and keep peace. The organization’s twofold mission is to improve the lives of people living in the rural villages of West Africa, while providing meaningful opportunities for workforce and community development to the West African community living in Providence, RI, where the organization was founded. It provides basic supports and economic and educational opportunities to these communities, with an emphasis on empowering women, youth, and young adults as agents of change and self-determination.


Refugee Dream Center - The Refugee Dream Center is a post resettlement refugee agency. It offers services targeting gaps within the refugee community by ensuring continuation of services in their efforts towards self-sufficiency and integration. The Refugee Dream Center does referrals, social level assistance, and skills development such as English language education for adults, health promotion and cultural orientation, youth mentoring, and case management. In addition, the Refugee Dream Center is a strong advocacy agency for the rights of refugees.


Rhode Island Coalition of Black Women  - The Rhode Island Coalition of Black Women is a nonprofit organization that helps Black and African American women to address the needs of their community through programs, networking and leadership. The mission is to empower Black women to become advocates for equality and change in the Black community.


SISTA FIRE  - SistaFire is an organization that is focused on Womxn of color who are making Rhode Island their home.


Showing Up for Racial Justice (SURJ) - SURJ is a national network that moves white folks into accountable action as part of a multi-racial movement through community organizing, mobilization and education. SURJ’s Rhode Island Chapter is a collective of people working at the intersection of whiteness and gender oppression to disrupt racism and white supremacy.


Sunrise Forever - Sunrise Forever’s work is driven by a passionate belief that we all have a responsibility, as global citizens, to be one another’s keeper and to share whatever we have been blessed with. Helping to make the world a better place where children can realize their dreams and live a purposeful life is our mission. Through this organization, families can be healthier and live happy lives while their communities thrive. Sunrise Forever’s priority is to help Liberian children and families live better lives and to transform their communities.


Tracing Center - The Tracing Center was founded in 2009 to build on our work in producing the Emmy-nominated PBS documentary, Traces of the Trade: A Story from the Deep North . The mission of the Tracing Center is to create greater awareness of the full extent of the nation’s complicity in slavery and the transatlantic slave trade and to inspire acknowledgement, dialogue and active response to this history and its many legacies. This is done for the purpose of racial justice, healing, and reconciliation, for the benefit of all.


The Center for Reconciliation - The Center for Reconciliation’s mission is to foster racial reconciliation and racial justice by confronting the legacy of slavery. This is a nonprofit organization based in Providence, R.I. and dedicated to the work of racial justice and racial reconciliation. The Center for Reconciliation was founded as an initiative of the Episcopal Diocese of Rhode Island and offers a wide range of public programs, exhibitions, and workshops about the history and legacies of slavery, the slave trade, and the construction of race and racial identities in New England and the United States.


Nonviolence Institute - The mission of the Nonviolence Institute is to teach, by word and example, the principles and practices of nonviolence, and to foster a community that addresses potentially violent situations with nonviolent solutions.


National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) Providence Branch - The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People is a non-profit organization established with the objective of insuring the political, educational, social, and economic equality of minority groups. Meetings are held every third Thursday of the month at 6:00pm. NAACP’s office is located at John Hope Settlement House, 7 Thomas P. Whitten Way, Providence, RI 02903. For more information, contact Branch Secretary Nicole Tingle: nicolestingle@gmail.com ; 401-521-6222 (main line); 401-400-1529 (direct line).


Americans Helping Others ProspEr (AHOPE) - AHOPE is a volunteer based, nonprofit organization that was established to assist needy individuals and families in Rhode Island requiring help to transition to permanent housing. Primarily, AHOPE’s work has focused on assisting new refugees coming to Rhode Island with little to their name. AHOPE is dedicated to helping families integrate into American society. AHOPE’s members range from students to professionals, all dedicated to helping develop prosperous Rhode Island communities.


Dorcas International Institute of Rhode Island - Dorcas International Institute of Rhode Island works to empower refugees and immigrants in the community by providing vital programs and services for legal aid and representation for citizenship and immigration, refugee resettlement, education, and more to help the people it serves to thrive and be successful.


Rhode Island Black Heritage Society - The Rhode Island Black Heritage Society is a nonprofit organization, and one of the oldest African Heritage organizations in the country, that seeks to preserve African diaspora descendant’s historical artifacts such as books, art and images. It also works in facilitating those who wish to educate others on African heritage.


Rhode Island Council for Muslim Advancement (RICMA) - RICMA is advancing Rhode Island’s Muslim Community through advocacy, service, and bridge-building. RICMA is a nonprofit organization that aims to advance the Rhode Island Muslim community by facilitating communication across and between the state's many Islamic institutions, organizations, and initiatives; and serving as a point of coordination and contact between the Muslim community and the broader Rhode Island community.


Stages of Freedom  - Stages of Freedom is a nonprofit organization that promotes black cultural events for the entire community along with educating inner-city youth by providing cultural opportunities such as access to museums and live performances.


Providence Youth Student Movement (PrYSM)  - PrYSM organizes at the intersections of race, class, gender, and sexual orientation by centering youth, female, queer, and people of color leadership in our campaigns, our organization, and our communities. PrYSM mobilizes queer Southeast Asian youth, families, and allies to build grassroots power and organize collectively for social justice.

 

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